Foodie Friday – How to Make Emoji Iced Cookies

Foodie Friday – How to Make Emoji Iced Cookies

You may have seen our recent emoji themed giveaway with Quadrille publishing where you can get your hands on this amazing little book, Cakemoji. To give you a little taster of what’s to expect we’re sharing a few fun extracts including these colourful emoji iced cookies. This tutorial includes everything you need to create perfect sugar cookies in your favourite designs, enjoy!

Emoji Cookies

Emoji Iced Cookie Recipe

You Will Need –

Makes approximately 12–16 cookies, depending on their size

  • Two quantities of basic cookie dough see below
  • One quantity of royal icing see below
  • Paste food colours in as many colours as necessary for your chosen emoji
  • Paper templates (see pages 94–5)

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 175°C/350°F/gas mark 4. Line two baking trays with parchment. Make a double quantity of cookie dough, following the recipe below. Chill in the fridge. Roll out the dough to 5mm (. in.) thickness.
  2. Using a cookie cutter or templates and a sharp knife, cut out cookie shapes following the instructions below. Transfer to the prepared trays and bake following the instructions below. Leave to cool completely.
  3. List all the emojis you are making in cookie form and the colours you need to ice each design. For the nerd emoji face cookie we used bright yellow, light brown, black and white royal icing.

TIP: When icing cookies you need two different consistencies of royal icing. Soft-peak or outline icing, which is thick enough to create outlines and boundaries that stop different coloured icings from mixing together, and flooding icing, which is runnier and quickly fills in large areas. The softpeak icing is also used to add extra details on top after the flooding icing has dried.

  1. Make up a quantity of soft-peak/outline royal icing following the instructions below. This will be enough to ice 12–16 cookies. Depending on your chosen emojis, colour up the amounts that you need.
  2. List all the different shades you require to ice your chosen emojis. Using a toothpick, add tiny amounts of your chosen gel food colour to a small amount of icing and mix until it matches the emoji colour.

Food Colour

Flood Icing

TIPS: Colour up 2–3 tablespoons of icing for each colour required for your chosen emojis. For shades that you will use more of – such as the emoji face yellow – then colour up a few extra tablespoons of icing.

When icing cookies, always outline and flood one colour at a time. Allow the icing to dry completely before adding the next colour to the cookie. This prevents the colours from bleeding into each other.

  1. Make a paper piping bag, fitting the bag with a 1.5 plain nozzle. Using a palette knife, place the soft-peak icing into the piping bag (see below).
  2. Referring to the instructions on page 85 on how to hold the piping bag and pipe the outlines, carefully follow all the lines that need to be piped in that outline colour.
  3. For the nerd emoji face, we piped the face, eyes and mouth outlines in bright yellow.
  4. Once the outlines in that colour are piped, place some of the icing back in the bowl and, following the instructions below, thin it with water until a flooding consistency. Place the flooding icing in a fresh piping bag and snip off a tiny piece at the tip of the bag.
  5. Fill the outlined area with the flooding icing in the same colour. If necessary, gently tap the cookie to help the icing fill the entire area. Do not overfill the area or the icing will overflow the outlines.
  6. Repeat with each colour needed to complete the emoji design. Allow the icing to dry completely before adding extra details.
  7. To add any surface details, such as the glasses and teeth, using soft-peak icing, carefully pipe any extra lines, dots or other shapes on top of the dry iced cookie.

Emoji Cookie

Emoji Cookie

Emoji Cookie

Emoji Cookie

Emoji Cookie

Cookie Dough Recipe

Ingredients

  • 200g (7 oz./11⁄₂ cups) plain (all-purpose) flour, sifted
  • Pinch of salt
  • 50g (13⁄₄ oz./1⁄₂ cup) ground almonds
  • 75g (22⁄₃ oz./6 tbsp) caster (granulated) sugar
  • 100g (31⁄₂ oz./1⁄₂ cup) unsalted butter, softened
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Method

Before rolling, knead the dough briefly to soften it, but do not overwork the dough. Try not to re-roll the dough more than once as your cookies may become tough. Use as little flour as possible when rolling out the dough to avoid your cookies become dry and cracked.

Always bake cookies that are the same size together on a tray, otherwise the smaller ones will bake faster than the larger ones.

Halfway through baking, turn the trays around to ensure that the cookies bake evenly on all sides.

  1. Line a baking tray with parchment.
  2. Preheat the oven to 175°C/350°F/gas mark 4.
  3. Place the flour and salt into a mixing bowl. Add the ground almonds and caster (granulated) sugar and stir to combine.
  4. Add the butter and mix at a slow speed until the mixture is crumbly and looks like sand.
  5. Add the egg yolks and vanilla extract and mix again until a firm dough forms. Do not overmix.
  6. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and place in the fridge for at least 1 hour, preferably overnight.
  7. Remove the dough from the fridge and knead to make it pliable. Roll out the dough on a floured surface to a thickness of 5mm (1⁄₈ in.), using spacers to ensure an even thickness.
  8. Cut out your cookie shapes (see pages 78–79) and put them on the prepared baking tray.
  9. Put your cut-out cookies back into the fridge to chill before baking – this helps them keep their shape.
  10. Bake the cookies for 10-12 minutes or until they are light golden brown on the top and sides. Check after 10 minutes, then if they are not ready, bake for a further 2 minutes before checking again.
  11. Once baked, carefully transfer the cookies onto a wire rack to cool. They will still be soft when hot but will firm up as they cool.

How to Roll Cookie Dough

Rolling Cookie Dough

Cookie Dough Cutting

  1. On a dusted surface roll out the dough to 5mm (5⁄₈ in) thickness using spacers to ensure even thickness. Any thinner and the cookies may crack whilst baking.
  2. Using a cookie cutter, punch out your cookie shapes.
  3. Alternatively, make card templates for the different cookie shapes (see pages 94–95) and, using a sharp knife, cut carefully around the template outline to create the cookie shape.
  4. Using a palette knife, transfer the cookie shapes onto a baking tray lined with parchment. Place the tray of cookies in the fridge for 30 minutes, then bake from chilled to prevent them from spreading

TIPS: For the best results, always roll out cookie dough from chilled.

Before rolling, knead the dough briefly to soften it, but do not overwork the dough. Try not to re-roll the dough more than once as your cookies may become tough. Use as little flour as possible when rolling out the dough to avoid your cookies become dry and cracked.

Always bake cookies that are the same size together on a tray, otherwise the smaller ones will bake faster than the larger ones.

Halfway through baking, turn the trays around to ensure that the cookies bake evenly on all sides.

Royal Icing Recipe

Make Icing

Ingredients

  • 1kg (35 oz./81⁄₂ cups) sifted icing (confectioners’) sugar
  • Squeeze of lemon juice (optional)
  • 6 medium (165g/6 oz.) egg whites

Method

  1. Place all the icing sugar, lemon juice (if using) and three-quarters of the egg white into a large bowl or the bowl of an electric stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment.
  2. Mix by hand or on the slowest speed for about 5 minutes, until all the powdery sugar has disappeared and the mixture looks smooth, but not wet. If the mixture looks too dry, add more egg white.
  3. Scrape down the sides of the bowl to make sure the icing sugar is combined. If the mixture is dry, add a little more liquid; if the mixture is runny, add a little more icing sugar.
  4. Beat slowly for a further 4–5 minutes to remove any lumps and achieve an icing that has a smooth, satin-like texture and forms stiff peaks that hold their shape.

Making Piping Bags

 

TIP: For extra strength, use waxed greaseproof paper, which is also called silicon paper, that can be bought from specialist baking suppliers. Alternatively, you can buy paper piping bags readymade from cake decorating suppliers.

  1. Take a 35cm (14 in.) by 35cm (14 in.) square of greaseproof paper. Using scissors, cut diagonally from a corner to the one opposite, sliding the blades through the paper, to make a triangle.
  2. Hold the triangle with the longest side furthest away from you and point closest to you. To form a cone, curl the right corner up and over to the top corner pointing towards you.
  3. Wrap the left corner around the cone to join the other corners at the back of the cone. Slide the paper between your thumbs and fingers until the cone forms a sharp tip.
  4. At the back of the cone, fold the corners over to the inside of the open end of the cone to prevent the piping bag from unravelling.
  5. Snip off the tip of the piping bag before inserting a piping nozzle.

Piping Techniques

Making Piping Bags

When not using, store any piping bags filled with icing in re-sealable plastic bags.

  1. If using a nozzle, place it in the piping bag. Using a palette knife, transfer the icing into the bag. Only ever half-fill a piping bag otherwise the icing will ooze out when squeezed.
  2. Flatten the open end of the piping bag and, with the seam centred on one side, fold over the ends of the bag away from the seam to keep the bag closed tight.
  3. Fold in the two outside corners, then fold over the top of the bag. Continue folding until you cannot fold any more. This creates the pressure needed to make piping easier.
  4. With the piping bag in your preferred hand, hold it between your thumb and fingers. Place your thumb over the folded end of the bag. Place your index finger down the seam.
  5. Guiding the tip with your free hand, pipe the lines. Hold the bag at a 45° angle to the surface. Touch the starting point with the tip and squeeze out the icing. Lift 2.5cm (1 in.) and guide the line.

Want to get your hands on a copy of cakemoji as well as lots of emoji themed goodies? Enter our giveaway with Quadrille publishing here.

Cakemoji CoverCakemoji by Jenni Powell

Published by Quadrille (£10)

Photography – Rita Platts

Available from Amazon

 

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